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Guest Blogger on Student Savvy

I’m very excited to be a guest blogger on Student Savvy.  The post was uploaded yesterday afternoon.

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Here is a peek at the article…..

6 Simple Strategies to Boost Student Behavior

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Student behavior can be quite complicated but the strategies teachers use can be simple, and yet still effective.  These six easy-to-implement behavior interventions are simple ways to boost your students behavior.  You can never have too many strategies since you never know what unique learner will be entering your class……To read the entire blog post click here.

Thanks so much Suzy!

 

I’m also linking up with RclassroomsRus for Friday’s News to share what we have done this week.  Check it out here.

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Self-Addressed Discipline

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Self Addressed Discipline is a good strategy to use when you have parents who are equally responsive to their child’s behavior as you.  When a student continues a behavior (calling out, out of seat, etc.), after a couple of warning, he/she is required to complete a form letter.  The letter identifies the inappropriate behavior and an explanation of how the student plans to correct the behavior in the future.

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The completed form is then put into an envelope with the parent name.  The student is informed that the letter will be placed in a file unless the student exhibits the inappropriate behavior again within a designated time frame (that day, that class period, etc.).

If the behavior occurs again then the letter is sent home or it could be scanned and emailed to the parents.  Parents should understand the meaning of this form.  The power behind this strategy is that the student knows the letter is sitting and ready to be sent home and the teacher is not making an idle threat such as “I’m going to call your parents”.  Some children can regain control of their behavior once the letter is ready to be sent home.

Get a FREE copy of the formed letter above HERE.

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Mystery Hero Student

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This strategy is helpful when a couple students are creating most of the behavior problems within the classroom.  The teacher explains that there is a student’s name written down and kept in the mystery hero student envelope.  Throughout the day, the teacher will be watching this student to see if they are following the classroom expectations or some other set criterion (ex: staying in seat, raising hand, keeping hands to self).

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If the mystery student meets the set criterion or expectations, then the whole class receives a reward and the name of the student will be revealed.  The rewards do not need to be big or even tangible.  I plan on having a future post about reward menus that will give lots of ideas! If the criterion is not met then the name of the student is not revealed (you do not want to embarrass the student) and another chance is given the next day.

Another option could be putting all the student names on popsicle sticks and place them in a jar.  At the end of the day, the teacher would pull out one stick.  If the student whose name was drawn has followed all the expectations throughout the day, then the student will get his/her name put on the “Mystery Hero” wall and be given a mystery hero certificate.

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You can create a bulletin board to post the names of the mystery hero students when they have been revealed.  I have created a Mystery Hero set that you can get HERE.

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Appointment Cards: Behavior Intervention

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Many inappropriate behaviors occur because the student is trying to get attention or avoid a task.  This intervention, “Appointment Cards”, helps give students the attention they want but at a more appropriate time that is designated by you.  As the teacher you need to give them the message that they are not in control of your classroom and that there is a more appropriate time to address the issue. If you do not want to stop instruction, then you can use appointment cards to formalize the process.

Let students know that you want to talk about the issue, but not at that moment and they can make an appointment to talk with you at a designated time. You can also use the appointment cards when YOU want to make an appointment with a student to discuss their behavior.

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This can be especially helpful for students who are on an individual behavior point system. Assign a point value for completing the card and they will be reinforced for completing the appointment card instead of continuing the disruptive behavior.  It is important to continue to give students different strategies that they can use and when students use one of these strategies, you should reward or reinforce that choice.

I made a set of that will be added to my behavior intervention toolkit.  You can get a set of them FREE here.

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Statement Cards

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The next addition to my toolkit for next year are Statement Cards.  When students engage in disruptive behavior (talking, out of seat, ect.) during instruction, it typically makes the teacher stop instruction in order to redirect the student.  The purpose of statement cards are to allow the teacher to redirect the student without stopping instruction and possibly becoming entangled in a power struggle.  The teacher simply places the card on the students desk and continues with the lesson.

It is just as important to reinforce positive behavior, especially in students who typically have behavioral issues.  Generally, in order to change negative behaviors, positive behavior must be reinforced at a more frequent rate than correcting negative behaviors, so half the cards have positive statements.

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I made the cards to match with a common color behavior system that some teachers use in their class with green, blue and purple being the positive statements and red, orange, and yellow being the corrective statements.

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These cards can also be used in conjunction with an individual behavior plan that incorporates a point system.  Teachers can give students chances to earn more points if they receive a positive card or use the corrective cards as warnings before points are taken away.

Cards can be kept in the front of the room or on the teachers desk in a filing system such as the one below.  They could also be placed on the teachers lanyard, so they are accessible at all times.

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You can get your FREE copy of 12 statement cards (6 positive and 6 corrective) by clicking on the following link.

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